Free songs

United States Seeks Delay In Trial On Us Air, Amr Deal Due To Shutdown

Can Iran Trust the United States?

(MORE: U.S. Soccer and Jones refute reports of injury) Jermaine Jones status may be up in the air; reports out of Germany say surgery will have Jones on the shelf for a few weeks. But Jones and U.S. Soccer are refuting those reports, so stay tuned on this one. Either way, if Jones has a knee issue, its fair to wonder if Schalke will be excited about extra travel and matches that are, officially speaking, meaningless. U.S. center back Clarence Goodson was a scratch from Sundays match at Chivas USA after suffering a bone bruise on the knee in the Earthquakes previous contest. Goodson, recall, was the starter alongside Omar Gonzalez as the United States clinched its spot earlier this month with the win over Mexico. Goodson may have slipped lately on the depth chart (blame young up-and-comer Anthony Brooks for that), but his steady night against El Tri reminded everyone that a tested, reliable veteran is great to have around. Word came Monday that Fabian Johnson has an ankle injury and may not be available for Hoffenheims match Saturday at Mainz 05. If Johnson does not play there, expect some reluctance from Hoffenheim to release their left-sided defender-midfielder for international duty. Landon Donovan (pictured below) was back on the field for the Galaxy on Sunday in Seattle, so he is likely to be on Klinsmanns list when the team gathers next week in Kansas City. But whether the Galaxy man will be at full-fitness (and therefor full effectiveness) is another matter. There is one other element potentially destructive to Klinsmanns plan: how will MLS teams feel about losing players for meaningless contests with significant implications in their one, league contests on the line?

As one can see, theIranians are the aggrieved partyin the conflict with the United States.Thus they have good reason to doubt the sincerity of recent conciliatory statements, especially when President Obama insists that all options are on the table which logically includes a military and even nuclear attack? Obama should match the conciliatory words with action. But, some will say, Iran is building a nuclear bomb. The problem is that this is not true. Twice the American intelligence complex (some 14 agencies) has concluded that Iran abandoned whatever weapons program it had in 2003, the year the U.S. government eliminated its archenemy, Saddam Hussein. Israeli intelligence agrees that Iran has not decided to build a bomb. Indeed, Irans Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, issued a religious fatwa condemning nuclear weapons years ago and has repeatedly invoked it. It is true that Iran has enriched uranium to near 20 percent (as it may do legally), but it is turning that uranium into plates , which, although suitable for medical purposes, are unsuitable for bombs. (Weapons-grade uranium is 90 percent enriched.) Moreover, Iran, a party to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, submits to inspections from the International Atomic Energy Agency, which has repeatedly certified that Irans uranium has not been diverted to making bombs. On the other hand, Israel, a nuclear power whose government (and American lobby) agitates for war between America and Iran, is not a member of the NPT.

Any settlement would mean asset sales, which in turn would require approval from the judge overseeing American’s emergence from bankruptcy. TEXAS SECURES CONCESSIONS Under the agreement announced on Tuesday, the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport would remain a hub for the combined carrier, whose headquarters would be in Texas. Almost two dozen small Texas airports would continue to get daily service, the Texas attorney general’s office said. Antitrust experts said that losing Texas from the suit was unlikely to affect the Justice Department’s ability to litigate to stop the deal. “The case will proceed without Texas and it will have no impact on the government without the state. I don’t think it will matter one way or another,” said Jonathan Lewis, an antitrust expert with Baker Hostetler. The airlines have defended the deal in court filings, saying it would create $500 million in savings to consumers annually by creating a stronger competitor to Delta Air Lines Inc (DAL.N) and United Continental Holdings Inc (UAL.N). But the Justice Department has said the merger would be bad for consumers. Its complaint focused on Reagan National Airport, which serves Washington D.C., where the two carriers control a combined 69 percent of takeoff and landing slots. It also listed more than 1,000 different routes where, between them, the two airlines dominate the market. The case at the U.S.

Comments are closed.