Free songs

New Nashville Hotel To Showcase Local Music

EDT October 2, 2013 Barlines, located inside the Omni Hotel, is a new option for local music and entertainment in downtown Nashville. (Photo: Karen Kraft, The Tennessean) SHARE 3 CONNECT 33 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE When the Omni Hotel officially opens this week, it also will mean the opening of a new live music venue that will feature local songwriters and artists. Barlines, a 280-seat bar and restaurant, is anchored by a raised stage in the middle. The goal, according to Barlines manager Rebecca Senita, is to give hotel guests an authentic Nashville experience while also giving local residents a new nightlife option. “We want to be Nashville’s new hot spot,” Senita said. “We’re going to have Southern comfort food and classic cocktails mixed with music and sports.” Barlines will book a variety of bands and have a weekly songwriter night on Tuesday, said Senita, who said the venue is booking its October calendar. Additionally, performances will be recorded and broadcast on the Barlines channel for hotel patrons. “We’re going to have music seven days a week from open to close, with sports mixed in as well for big games, featuring Titans games,” she said. “Our music will range from country honky-tonk style to country-rock, bluegrass, rockabilly. We have a good variety of artists that we’re going to bring in.” Barlines is on the first floor of the west side of the 800-room hotel behind the Country Music Hall of Fame at 250 Fifth Ave. S.

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Chris Chafe used electrodes to record the brain waves of an individual in the throes of a seizure. Then they converted the spikes of rapidly firing brain cells into tones that mimic the human voice. “My initial interest was an artistic one at heart, but, surprisingly, we could instantly differentiate seizure activity from non-seizure states with just our ears,” Chafe, a professor of music research at the university, said in a written statement. “It was like turning a radio dial from a static-filled station to a clear one.” The researchers say their “brain stethoscope” could lead to the development of a biofeedback device that would make it possible for caregivers to detect seizures in people with epilepsy simply by listening to their brain wave activity. “Someone – perhaps a mother caring for a child — who hasn’t received training in interpreting visual EEGs [electroencephalograms] can hear the seizure rhythms and easily appreciate that there is a pathological brain phenomenon taking place,” Parvizi, associate professor of neurology at the university, said in the statement. Also on HuffPost: Loading Slideshow The Brain As Art Wellcome Trust employee Zoe Middleton poses for the media by a work entitled ‘My Soul’ by artist Katherine Dawson, that is a laser etched in lead crystal glass of the artist’s own MRI scan, at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March, 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) French Phrenological Model A French Phrenological model, from the mid 19th century, of a head with brain exposed is seen on display at an exhibition call ‘Brains – The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Pathologies In Brain Specimens A selection of brain specimens preserved in acrylic illustrating different pathologies on loan from the Mutter Museum -The College of Physicians of Philadelphia are seen on display at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Surgical Skull Holes A Bronze Age skull from Jericho in the West Bank that shows four holes made by the ancient surgical process of trephination carried out to treat a range of medical conditions, some of which were believed to have been caused by evil spirits, is on display at the exhibition ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Diagrams of the Skull A member of the media takes an image of diagrams of the human skull at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) ‘Brains – Mind as Matter’ A Wellcome Trust employee stands in front of a video that journeys through slices of the brain in a kaleidoscope of colour at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Bits of Brilliance: Einstein’s Brain Two slices of Albert Einstein’s brain are seen at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March, 27, 2012.

Music weekend goes Romantic

17 to Saturday, Oct. 19. Everything takes place at St. Peter’s Anglican Church and Hall located just off Maple Bay Road. “They’re really fun and the price is very affordable,” according to Valley music teacher Susan Doughty. Sessions are planned for ages 11 and up, but all are welcome. If you have a music teacher or choir director, you can probably register with him or her, but if you don’t, it’s easy to email Marilyn Rummel at marilyn@harpcanada.com for more information and then to register. There’s an early bird price of $95 for the entire weekend but that’s only until Oct. 5. It’s also possible to attend individual workshops. Check out cowichanmusicteachers.com for all the registration information. As usual, a great group of experts is leading the sessions, including Bruce Vogt (piano), James Mark (strings), Susan Young (vocal music) and Elizabeth Volpe Bligh (harp). The event also includes The Soiree on Friday, Oct. 18: an evening of the sort favoured by iconic Romantic composer Frederic Chopin and his friends, offered in salon style, with beverages and treats. “This will be a rare concert indeed, an unusual event, like a moveable feast: first, music beautifully performed by the clinicians, in the church, then dancing, eating, poetry readings and harp/violin music in the hall, and a return to the church for the finale.

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